The Value of Conservation

Some may question the benefits of energy conservation.  Many argue how can the little things I do at home really make a difference?   This graphic should help to bring it all home.

Brought to you by

Is the next energy revolution hiding in your trash can?

Waste reclamation is still a small business in the US, but considering how much trash Americans keep generating, advocates see tremendous potential to grow.

The oldest sources of fuel were wood and animal dung, followed by coal, oil, solar, and wind—we can now add trash to the mix.

A recent report from Columbia University’s Earth Engineering Center argues that turning garbage into energy solves two problems: growing landfills and our ever-increasing use of energy.

A Simple Idea

It all started with a simple idea. If we can turn oil into plastic, why can’t we turn plastic back into oil?

It’s not only possible, it’s happening all over the country. In 13 states and the District of Columbia, more than 10 percent of the plastic waste is converted into different kinds of fuel: synthetic oil, synthetic gas (“syngas”), steam, and electricity.

The work is done in waste-to-energy plants, many of them powered by waste products. The power plants’ own waste product is steam, which some—including many in Denmark—have captured and used to heat houses.

If all the trash that ended up in landfills went to these waste-to-energy plants instead, it could generate enough electricity to power one out of every eight households in the United States, according to the report, and the steam could heat another 9.8 million homes.

Waste reclamation is still a small business in the United States, but considering how much trash Americans keep generating, advocates recognize tremendous growth potential. In 2011,  84 waste-to-energy plants in the United States converted about four million tons of plastic into energy. Nickolas J. Themelis and Charles Mussche, authors of the Columbia University report, say that every ton of trash combusted in modern waste-to-energy power plants replaces almost half a ton of coal. Diverting trash to power plants could reduce coal mining by about 100 million tons per year—about 10 percent of domestic coal production.

According to Themelis and Mussche, simply extracting non-recyclable plastic out of the trash in landfills could save the equivalent of 48 million tons of coal, or 180 million barrels of oil each year.

Many states import coal from their neighbors even as they are shipping trash to out of state landfills the report notes. Converting their own trash into energy could reduce coal imports—and in a few cases, stop it entirely: New York, California, Indiana, New Jersey, and Michigan all send more energy (read: trash) to landfills than they import as coal. Nationally, the use of waste-generated fuel instead of coal could reduce the US state-to-state transportation of coal by 22 percent, say the researchers.

California currently imports almost 2 million tons of coal each year; this could be eliminated by routing just 15 percent of the state’s trash away from landfills to waste-to-energy plants.

The United States remains inconsistent embracing waste-to-energy options. More than half of all states don’t yet combust any of their trash, while others have invested heavily in the new technology. Connecticut leads the pack, converting two out of every three pounds of trash into energy. The District of Columbia, Massachusetts, and Maine burn between a quarter and a half of their waste, while 29 states do no combustion at all, just piling their trash into landfills.

Themelis and Mussche note in their report that landfills grow by more than 6,000 acres annually—the equivalent of seven Central Parks in size. Isn’t it time to stop throwing away energy?

 

Brought to you by

Vampire (Gadgets) Are Coming For You. And Yes, You Should Be Scared.

I’m not sure about you, but once October hits, it’s time to start seriously thinking about planning one of my favorite holidays of the year: Halloween. It’s not every day that we get to dress up looking like whatever we want and not get weird looks for it. Kids are happily roaming neighborhoods, adults like to have fun with it, and of course there are plenty of haunted hayrides to attend. But, did you know that some of your household devices are always dressed for the occasion? They are called vampire devices.

I’m not sure about you, but once October hits, it’s time to start thinking about planning for one of my favorite holidays of the year: Halloween. It’s not every day that we get to dress up looking like whatever we want and not get weird looks for it.

Kids are happily roaming neighborhoods, adults like to have fun with it, and of course, there are plenty of haunted hayrides to attend. But, did you know that some of your household devices are always dressed for the occasion? These gadgets are called “vampires.” Much like a real one, vampire devices have a way of slowly taking all the electricity from your home whether they are “on,” “off,” or in “standby” mode.

Yikes! Think of all the electronics you have in your home that stay in standby mode when not in use? In that state, they may be considered “off” but are still sucking electricity. I can think of a couple that I have in my own room: my laptop and digital picture frame. From there, the list goes on as you explore your own house. For now, we will take a look at some of the most popular vampire devices so you’ll be more aware of what exactly could be lurking in your bedroom at night. Fear not, there are solutions.

The TV

If you have a plasma TV, you may want to think of upgrading to a more energy efficient kind, such as a LED TV. The reason? Plasma screens suck up A LOT of electricity—they’re not very efficient. Even if you watch TV for four hours per day, the screen is still using electricity during the other 20 when it’s turned off.

Cable Box

Even though you might turn off your cable box when you’re not using it (emphasis on the might—because let’s face it, most of us don’t), it’s still using power when you’re asleep…24/7 in fact. The displays of channel numbers don’t just magically appear there; rather they require light (which consumes electricity) for illumination, along with other internal parts that are always energized. As outlined in this article, cable boxes are certainly not energy efficient and are one of the top consumers of electricity in your home. By unplugging the box when the TV is not in use, you have the potential to save a lot of that hard-earned cash.

DVD Player

When I supposedly “turn off” my DVD player, a little red light appears to let me know that it’s off, as opposed to a green light when it’s on. However, it’s not really off because the light is on. Does that make sense? Power is still flowing into the DVD player because if it weren’t, the light wouldn’t still be on. Most DVD players only get used once in a while anyways, so when you’re not using it, unplug the darn thing! You can easily plug it back in the next time you want to watch The Notebook for the millionth time.

Laptop or Desktop Computers

Whoa. I know it may be hard to believe, but there are actually some times during the day/night that we aren’t using our computers…GASP! I didn’t know it was possible. When a desktop computer is left on all day, the screen may go black, however the computer is still working to power all the applications and programs that are running in the background. Even on “sleep” mode it’s still using energy. And, when it’s plugged in charging all night? That’s unnecessary power that it’s using. Be smart about how you take care of your computers – it’s best just to shut them down when you’re not using them.

Game Consoles

This is another big one. Along with the DVD player, there is still a green light illuminated when you turn your X-Box off (red for a PlayStation). As I said above, it takes electricity to make it light up. When you think you’re turning game consoles off, think again. They’re actually just in standby mode. To fully turn it off and stop power from flowing to it, hit the other off-switch, usually located on the back of the device.

Cell Phone Chargers

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again. When your cell phone is plugged in for hours on end, it’s not only damaging the phone, but it’s wasting electricity as well. Furthermore, when the phone isn’t plugged into the charger, it’s still using electricity. In this case, it’s best to just unplug the charger from the wall when you’re not using it to charge your phone.

Don’t be too fearful of these vampires, though. If we band together and take action against them, we WILL succeed. To prevent our homes from further attacks, get into the habit of unplugging these things. Buying a power strip will also do you some good, too. That way, you’ll only have to flip one switch instead of dealing with multiple cords. Also…garlic.

 

 

 

 

Brought to you by

Energy Efficiency at Work

Lowering your energy costs around the office can not only help the environment, but also boost your business's bottom line. Here's a look at strategies for improving energy efficiency at work.

It doesn’t matter if your office or workspace is in  luxury building in a big city or the “spare room” at your home.  Lowering energy costs around the office not only helps the environment, it also boosts your business’s bottom line.  Here’s a look at strategies for improving energy efficiency at work.

Buy energy efficient equipment:

When it’s time to replace computer monitors and other equipment, consider purchasing ENERGY STAR models. This could cut energy consumption by up to 75 percent compared to conventional products.

Power down and unplug equipment that’s not in use:

Have employees turn off and unplug their computers, printers or another equipment before they leave the office. Electronic devices that are turned off but still plugged in can still draw a small amount of power, so use an energy strip to reduce this energy drain.

Set electronics to hibernate or sleep mode:

This way, even if workers forget to power down their computers or other equipment or they walk away for a short time, they’ll consume less power. Most printers and copiers also have an energy-saving mode you could use to reduce your energy consumption.

Use energy efficient lighting:

Use natural lighting when you can and consider replacing conventional light bulbs with more compact fluorescent bulbs. Keep windows and skylights clean to maximize natural lighting.

Add motion sensors:

Installing motion sensors in storage rooms, conference rooms, or other areas that are occupied only sporadically will reduce your energy usage instead of relying on employees to flip off the switch themselves when they leave the room.

Get a programmable thermostat:

During weekends and evening hours when your offices are likely not occupied, set the temperature accordingly to reduce heating and cooling costs.

Use cloud computing to reduce local server costs:

Running a local server incurs energy costs around the clock, so some businesses have switched to cloud computing instead. Cloud computing also allows employees to work from home, another source of energy savings.

Allow employees to telecommute:

If your line of business allows for telecommuting, then having fewer people in the office running computers and printers could help reduce your energy use. If telecommuting becomes very successful, you may find that as your head count increases, you won’t need to expand your office space proportionately. Remember: a larger office space often costs more money to heat, cool and light.

Research environmental grants and loans:

The U.S. Small Business Administration offers environmental grants and loans to help small businesses defray the costs of energy efficient upgrades. If you’re planning an upgrade, these options may be worth investigating.

 

*Photo courtesy of Financial Times, CC / BY 2.0

 

Brought to you by

Energy Saving Advice for People Who Can’t Get Away From Technology

It seems as though technology innovation is moving at a faster-than-ever pace, and keeping up with the latest trends can be important to some. If you’re like me, always on the computer or laptop, or simply perusing the different apps you have on your phone, here are some tips for you to save on energy consumption while doing so.

I’m sure you’re already well aware of the two new iPhone 6’s that recently hit the market. I’m usually not one to go out and buy the latest new things, but I did get this one. After all, the phone I had before was sooo 2010.

It seems as though technology innovation is moving at a faster-than-ever pace, and keeping up with the latest trends can be important to some. If you’re like me—always on the computer or laptop, or simply perusing the different apps you have on your phone—here are some tips for you to save on energy consumption while doing so.

Take Inventory

What do you have vs. what do you actually use? A good example – I am an Apple user, so I have an iPhone, MacBook Pro Laptop, an iPad, and an iPod. Phew, that’s a long list. I’m exhausted just talking about it. But, imagine how much energy they consume if they are left running when not in use? I am never running these four devices at once, so when they aren’t being used, guess what they’re doing? With the exception of my phone, all other devices are turned OFF or in SLEEP MODE when not being used. Know what purpose each device serves, and only use them for what they are intended for. The longer the batteries for your devices stay charged, the less often you will have to charge them. Which ultimately means saving electricity and money.

tech stuff - energy saving advice

Re-evaluate Your “Need”

This can be a scary concept to grasp for all you folks (and myself) who are constantly connected to everything through our devices. With the emergence of popular apps like SnapChat, Instagram, Tinder, and Candy Crush, it’s almost impossible to stay off our phones, as that is the only way to access many of these apps. However, we must resist the urge to have multiple devices running at once and choose between the Internet or phone apps. How badly do we really NEED to be SnapChatting, posting to Facebook, and checking email at the same time? Pick one over the other, and when you’re done using the device, it’s now acceptable to pick up your phone and start snapping away. Remember, the less time you are glued to your devices, the less energy they are expending.

using one device - energy saving advice

Play with Settings

Turn your “power saver mode” on, and make sure the brightness of your device isn’t at its maximum. Close out your apps or programs after you’re done with them and ALWAYS remember to unplug any cords from your computer when they aren’t in use. By doing these things, your device will get some extended battery life, making it so that you don’t have to “plug-in” as often.

settings - energy saving advice

Charging

Deciding when to charge your device can be a challenge. Especially if you run out of power multiple times a day. Do I charge my phone when it still has 30% battery so it will last the whole night, or do I let it die half way through the evening? The struggle is real, people.

For the most part, though, I only charge my devices when they absolutely need to be charged. It’s also important to turn them off when charging so the device isn’t using and taking in energy at the same time. This can leave the device as confused as we were when Miley Cyrus’ “Wrecking Ball” music video came out. Wait to unplug your device until it’s fully charged so the battery doesn’t start creating a memory that will eventually cause it to drain faster.

And finally, I know it’s tempting, but try NOT to charge your devices overnight. It doesn’t really take a full 8 hours to charge a phone or computer, does it? At maximum, it only takes a couple of hours. So, before you waste all that energy and electricity, be sure it’s sufficiently charged before you crawl into bed – the last thing we want is to miss our morning alarm because the device wasn’t charged enough.

charging - energy saving advice

 

Unplug

After your technology is good and charged for the day, don’t forget to unplug the chargers from the wall. No matter what the device is (laptop, phone, tablet, camera), this is an essential step in the conservation of energy. And also the conservation of dollar bills in your pocket.

unplug - energy saving advice

Being obsessed with technology is a country wide pandemic, especially for people who grew up with the stuff or have to use it for work. We are all aware and fully capable of understanding the fact that technology is here to stay. However, there are ways to curb our addiction, as expressed above. If we cut back a little on when we use technology and consciously think about how we use it, it could greatly benefit our lives. Not only will we save energy (which equates to cash!), but we might find a healthier balance between our online and actual social lives.

Brought to you by

5 Smartphone Apps to Make You More Energy Efficient

You may not realize it, but your smartphone is good for more than checking email, making calls, and playing Minecraft—you can use it to help you track your energy efficiency and save on your electricity bills, thanks to a number of innovative mobile apps.

If you’re like most of the American population, you’ve probably got a smartphone in your pocket right now (or maybe you’re even reading this from your mobile screen). You may not realize it, but your smartphone is good for more than checking email, making calls, and playing Minecraft—you can use it to help you track your energy efficiency and save on your electricity bills, thanks to a number of innovative mobile apps.

Here are five apps worth checking out for help with going green around your house:

Green Outlet (iOS, $0.99)

Do you know how much you’re paying for kilowatt/hour of electricity? Just plug in that number, add the appliances and electronics you use in your house, and this app will help you learn how much you’re paying to power all of your electronic devices. It’s a great way to get a forecast of your monthly electricity bill, and learn what you can do to save.

Green Outlet
Green Outlet is just one of many apps to help you monitor your home energy use.

Leafully (iOS, free)

This free mobile app can be connected to collect data from more than a dozen regional utility companies, and provides you with weekly reports to let you know whether your energy usage was higher or lower than usual. It also helps you to measure and visualize your family’s environmental footprint, letting you know how many trees would need to be planted to offset your carbon emissions, and helping you to purchase carbon offsets.

Light Bulb Finder (iOS and Android, free)

Want to replace your conventional light bulbs with energy-saving equivalents, but not sure what to buy? This app helps you track size, wattage, and price for all kinds of energy-saving bulbs. You can even conveniently purchase your new bulbs directly through the app’s shopping interface, rather than trekking out to the hardware store.

Easy Battery Saver (Android, free)

While your smartphone is by no means the most power-hungry gadget in your home (link to Anna’s piece), if you find yourself needing to charge your phone frequently, it’s worth taking efforts to conserve electricity. This simple app can change the settings on your phone to preserve maximum battery life, enabling you to go longer between charges.

JouleBug (iOS and Android, free)

This app turns sustainable living into a game! Get access to tips (called “Pins”) on how to make your everyday actions more environmentally friendly, and gain points for completing each action. You can connect with your friends, and compete to see who’s completed the most Pins to discover who’s the greenest of them all. A “yearly impact” calculator helps you visualize the difference that you’re making in your life—and the world—with these simple actions.

 

Brought to you by

3 Simple Steps To Tame Your Power Hungry Home

3 Simple steps-that is all it takes to tame your power hungry home and save money. These days, there are a lot of electronic gadgets in our homes. From flipping on that coffee pot in the morning, to watching TV at night, we depend on electricity for everything we do. However, just a portion of your household appliances account for the majority of your electricity consumption. With some simple adjustments, you can save both money and energy by tackling these power-hungry categories.

These days, there are a lot of electronic gadgets in our homes. From flipping on that coffee pot in the morning, to watching TV at night, we depend on electricity for everything we do.

However, just a portion of your household appliances account for the majority of your electricity consumption. With some simple adjustments, you can save both money and energy by tackling these power-hungry categories.

1. Hot water heaters

Having access to instant hot water at the tap is one of modern life’s greatest conveniences. From steamy showers to the warm suds that clean our dishes and our clothes, our hot water heaters get a constant workout. The average home uses about 45 gallons of hot water each day, which adds up to hundreds of dollars a year on your power bill.

There are several ways to lower this cost. The most obvious one is to use less hot water, which can be accomplished through shorter showers and more efficient dishwashers and washing machines. You may also want to go to the source and replace your water heater with a more efficient model. Then, set your water heater’s thermostat to 120 degrees or lower, which will provide water hot enough for most uses (and can prevent scalding burns as well).

 2. Cooling systems

We’ve talked about the hot stuff, now let’s talk about the cold stuff. Whether you have central air or window units, air conditioning systems use a lot of electricity. Running a 5,000 BTU window unit in one room 24 hours a day could be costing you nearly $600 per year. (Use this online calculator to determine the cost of your central air system.) During the summer months, cooling costs can make up 40% to 70% of your electric bill.

To bring those bills down, make sure your home is well insulated and that any cracks or gaps are sealed, especially around window units. For central systems, use a programmable thermostat and keep the filter clean. Also consider using window shades, screens, or films to keep the sun’s heat from entering your home. Finally, limit stovetop cooking and use an outdoor grill instead of your oven during hot months; heat from the kitchen will just make your AC system work harder.

3. Other household appliances

Did you know your hair dryer uses more power than your clothes washer or your refrigerator? Drawing up to 1,875 watts, a hair dryer used every day can really add up. But it’s not the only power hog that you plug into the wall. Dishwashers, clothes dryers, and vacuum cleaners all take a lot of energy to run. You can view the typical wattages of a variety of household appliances here.

While letting your hair air-dry and hanging your clothes on a clothesline to dry can save quite a few kilowatts, such options aren’t always practical, especially in winter. So what else can you do to save?

First off, when it’s time to buy a new appliance, be sure to check out Energy Star models. Products with the Energy Star label must meet certain energy efficiency requirements, and they include everything from phones to furnaces.

In addition, try to unplug items that aren’t in use, because televisions, microwaves and many other common appliances draw small amounts of stand-by power even when turned off.

And, of course, when possible, limit the use of electronic items. Being mindful of your daily habits will help keep costs down.

 

Brought to you by

6 Tips for Renters on Saving Money on Electricity

Do you rent your home and looking to be more energy efficient and save on your power bill? Chances are you don't want to pay for pricing things like windows or insulation. Fortunately renters can still make a host of small changes to help lower their heating and cooling bills.

Most energy-savings tips only apply to homeowners—if you’re only renting, you’re not likely to pay for pricey insulation in a house you don’t own. But even if you can’t make major renovations or upgrade to energy-efficient appliances, renters can still make small changes to help lower their heating and cooling bills.

Windows are a great place to focus, as many apartments have older ones that aren’t well-insulated and allow for heat loss. And when landlords aren’t footing the energy bill, they have little incentive to pay for upgrades.

Here’s a look at several renter-friendly strategies for saving money on your electricity and heating bills.

Use insulated drapes

Insulated drapes are an inexpensive way to keep out cold air, especially in a room with lots of windows. You should be able to purchase simple insulated drapes inexpensively and move them with you to future apartments. Use tension rods if you’re concerned about leaving nail or screw holes above the windows.

Place plastic on the windows

An inexpensive plastic window insulation kit can help you keep out drafts. This video shows how to weatherize windows using plastic. Once windows are sealed, you can’t easily open them again without removing the plastic, so you may want to leave one or two windows in the kitchen uncovered case you overcook something and need to air out the room (remember to close the window later).

Weather strip doors and windows

This video shows you how to install peel-and-stick weather stripping. A few benefits of weather stripping: you can still open and close your windows and they can help keep out bugs and outside noise. You can use weather stripping in combination with plastic insulation or insulated drapes.

Get a space heater

If you need to heat a small space like a bedroom, it’s sometimes more efficient to use a space heater rather than heating the entire apartment or house. Just be sure to position the space heater away from other furniture and turn it off when you leave the room to lower your risk of fire.

Clean heating and cooling vents

When dust and other debris build up in in your heating and cooling system, it forces the system to work harder to heat or cool your home. By changing the HVAC filters (if applicable) and vacuuming the vents periodically, you’ll help the system run as efficiently as it can, even if your landlord isn’t ready to upgrade.

Remove window AC units

If you leave an air conditioning unit in your window year round, you’re likely letting warm air escape or cold air in through gaps between the unit and your window. Remove AC units at the end of the warm season and store them until the following spring. Better yet, use fans and open windows instead of running energy-sucking AC units.

 

Brought to you by